Your entitlements

Do you help individuals and families in need of emergency financial help? This comprehensive, up-to-date and easy-to-navigate guide containing 1700 grant-making charities giving £308.5 million in funds, will simplify the often difficult task of finding the most appropriate support for your clients by outlining the eligibility criteria, amounts available and how to apply.

You’ll benefit from extensive advice on how to select funds and make successful applications, as well as a directory of useful organisations.

The 16th edition of The Guide to Grants for Individuals in Need, containing over 200 new grant-makers, is the only publication to provide a comprehensive listing of all sources of non-statutory funding available for individuals in the UK.

Member price:

Standard price:

£95.00
 

http://www.healthcareimprovementscotland.org/

About us

We are Healthcare Improvement Scotland, an organisation with many parts and one purpose – better quality health and social care for everyone in Scotland.

We have five key priorities. 

These are areas where we believe we can make the most impact and where we focus our efforts and resources.

  • Enabling people to make informed decisions about their care and treatment.
  • Helping health and social care organisations to redesign and continuously improve services.
  • Provide evidence and share knowledge that enables people to get the best out of the services they use and helps services improve.
  • Provide quality assurance that gives people confidence in the services and supports providers to improve.
  • Making the best use of resources, we aim to ensure every pound invested in our work adds value to the care people receive.

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The Below Article is from https://www.careinspectorate.com/index.php/complaints

One of the most important ways for us to make sure care services improve is by listening to your concerns. These may be about a care service or about the Care Inspectorate. 

For more information, you can read unhappy about a care service? 


How we deal with concerns and complaints‘ explains the process.

How to make a complaint

Registered care service

If you are not happy with the level of care you or someone you care for is receiving, we would encourage you to first of all speak to the care service itself about your concerns. This is often the quickest way to resolve a problem. 

However, you can choose to complain directly to us by either:

Whichever method you use to, we will deal with your complaint following ‘How we deal with concerns and complaints‘.

In summary, this means we will:

  • acknowledge that we have received your complaint within three working days
  • aim to complete the investigation within 40 working days
  • let you know if we think there will be a delay and give you the reasons for the delay
  • let you know our findings and the outcome of the complaint.

If you are unhappy with the outcome, you have the right to ask the Scottish Public Services Ombudsman (SPSO) to look into our decision. The SPSO website has information on making a complaint and the types of complaints it looks at. They are the final stage for handling complaints about public services in Scotland.

Other organisations

Local authority social work departments: you need to contact the local authority and ask about their complaints procedure. 

NHS hospital or clinic: you need to contact the local NHS board.

Independent health service or hospice: contact Healthcare Improvement Scotland.

If you want to raise a concern about a specific individual (or individuals) working in a care service – rather than the service itself – the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC) may be able to help. The SSSC regulates a wide range of social care workers: www.sssc.uk.com. The SSSC can only consider concerns about workers who are registered or applying to register with it. You can check if a worker is registered by searching the Register or by calling the SSSC on 0345 603 0891.

The Above Article is from https://www.careinspectorate.com/index.php/complaints

PDF Procedure for Handling Complaints – Care Inspectorate

More Information and the below article can be found at https://www.careinspectorate.com/index.php/type-of-care Services we regulate, check and inspect

We regulate and inspect care services in Scotland to make sure that they meet the right standards. We also jointly inspect with other regulators to check how well different organisations in local areas work to support adults and children.  You can find out more about each of the care services that we regulate here.

You can also read more about our joint inspections of services for children and young people and our joint inspections of services for adults within the professionals area of our website.


Childminding

Childminders are professional childcare workers who work from their own homes to provide a childcare service for other people’s children in a family setting. 

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Daycare of Children

Day care is care provided for infants and toddlers, pre-schoolers and school-aged children in a centre-based facility, such as a nursery, playgroup or afterschool club.

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Care homes for adults

There are no legal differences between residential homes and nursing homes. They are all care homes and can be more flexible about the services they offer. They can meet all aspects of your accommodation, support and care including nursing and end-of-life care.

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Care at home

Care at home makes sure that as many people as possible are supported in their own homes. The care at home service can touch on all aspects of your daily life in your own home.

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Support services

These fall under the heading of day care and can be offered within a care home, centre or to those provided directly in the community and not based in a centre. Support services can help with people who need support with very complicated need to people who need time-limited support at various times.

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Housing support

Housing support covers a range of activities that allow you to maintain your accommodation, meet your duties and responsibilities as a tenant and get involved in the local community.

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More Information and the above article can be found at https://www.careinspectorate.com/index.php/type-of-care

Definition of disability under the Equality Act 2010 Can be found at https://www.gov.uk/definition-of-disability-under-equality-act-2010

A physical or mental impairment which has an effect on his or her ability to carry out normal day to day activities. The effect must be:


  • Substantial; and

  • Long-term; and

  • Adverse.

  • Meaning of disability

    • From December 2005 someone with cancer, HIV or MS will be deemed to be disabled.
    • Previously had to have some effect on them but now from the point of diagnosis.
    • Removes the requirement that a mental illness must be “clinically well recognised

The Non-Executive Bills Unit’s Explanatory Notes (see General Note: Explanatory Notes) say: ” 
The Act will lead to all disabled street parking places becoming enforceable. The general approach of the Act is to impose a duty on local authorities, in particular circumstances, to exercise its power to make a particular kind of order under either section 45 (street parking places) or section 35 (off-street parking places) of the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984 (the 1984 Act). The Act does not amend the 1984 Act itself in any way. These kinds of orders which the local authorities are to be required to make are already open to them under the 1984 Act. The powers under the 1984 Act are not affected; rather, this Act separately imposes a duty to exercise those powers in particular circumstances. Once the duty under this Act is triggered, the provision as to procedure and enforcement etc. is that applicable under the 1984 Act.” Continue reading