Accessing services

The Scottish Community Development Centre has released new support materials have been produced to accompany the revised National Standards for Community Engagement. Developed in partnership with Glasgow Disability Alliance (GDA), the National Standards for Community Engagement are now in the following accessible formats:


•    Easy Read version of the National Standards for Community Engagement
•    Easy Read – plain large print (18pt) of the National Standards for Community Engagement 
•    Easy Read – plain large print (24pt) of the National Standards for Community Engagement
•    Audio version (MP3) of the National Standards for Community Engagement 
•    A braille version of the National Standards for Community Engagement is also available on request. 

View and download the accessible versions by clicking here. For more information or further support around accessible versions of the Standards, please contact Paul Nelis at SCDC on 0131 248 1924 or e-mail paul@scdc.org.uk.

From Fife Centre for Equalities e-bulletin June 2017

The below information is from http://www.healthcareimprovementscotland.org/our_work/standards_and_guidelines/stnds/neurological_care_standards.aspx

General standards for neurological care and support

It is estimated that as many as a million adults in Scotland are living with a wide range of complex and life-changing neurological conditions such as Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy, and Huntington’s disease, as well as those affected by cerebral palsy, brain injury, nerve and muscle disorders. Neurological disease can affect people in different ways; no two people living with a neurological condition are the same. People should expect to receive the same high quality service from the health and social care organisations that support them, regardless of their condition, geographical location or individual circumstances. Continue reading

The below information is from http://www.healthcareimprovementscotland.org/our_work/standards_and_guidelines/stnds/opah_standards.aspx

Care of older people in hospital standards

Everyone using healthcare services in Scotland is entitled to the same level of care regardless of their age, however, it is recognised that older people are admitted more often to hospital, and can face problems not experienced by other user groups.  

We have developed standards to support staff and ensure the highest standards for the care of older people in hospital presenting with an acute episode, wherever healthcare is delivered. 

These standards supersede the 2002 Clinical standards for older people in acute care. Continue reading

 Brian Rosie of the Adult Protection Committee advised us about a text alert system he uses on his bank account. We asked Lisa Marriage from the Community Protection Team of the Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) for more information. The Royal Bank of Scotland have been working with the Scottish Business Resilience Centre on ways to tackle financial harm. Continue reading

The Below Article is from https://www.careinspectorate.com/index.php/complaints

One of the most important ways for us to make sure care services improve is by listening to your concerns. These may be about a care service or about the Care Inspectorate. 

For more information, you can read unhappy about a care service? 


How we deal with concerns and complaints‘ explains the process.

How to make a complaint

Registered care service

If you are not happy with the level of care you or someone you care for is receiving, we would encourage you to first of all speak to the care service itself about your concerns. This is often the quickest way to resolve a problem. 

However, you can choose to complain directly to us by either:

Whichever method you use to, we will deal with your complaint following ‘How we deal with concerns and complaints‘.

In summary, this means we will:

  • acknowledge that we have received your complaint within three working days
  • aim to complete the investigation within 40 working days
  • let you know if we think there will be a delay and give you the reasons for the delay
  • let you know our findings and the outcome of the complaint.

If you are unhappy with the outcome, you have the right to ask the Scottish Public Services Ombudsman (SPSO) to look into our decision. The SPSO website has information on making a complaint and the types of complaints it looks at. They are the final stage for handling complaints about public services in Scotland.

Other organisations

Local authority social work departments: you need to contact the local authority and ask about their complaints procedure. 

NHS hospital or clinic: you need to contact the local NHS board.

Independent health service or hospice: contact Healthcare Improvement Scotland.

If you want to raise a concern about a specific individual (or individuals) working in a care service – rather than the service itself – the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC) may be able to help. The SSSC regulates a wide range of social care workers: www.sssc.uk.com. The SSSC can only consider concerns about workers who are registered or applying to register with it. You can check if a worker is registered by searching the Register or by calling the SSSC on 0345 603 0891.

The Above Article is from https://www.careinspectorate.com/index.php/complaints

PDF Procedure for Handling Complaints – Care Inspectorate

More Information and the below article can be found at https://www.careinspectorate.com/index.php/type-of-care Services we regulate, check and inspect

We regulate and inspect care services in Scotland to make sure that they meet the right standards. We also jointly inspect with other regulators to check how well different organisations in local areas work to support adults and children.  You can find out more about each of the care services that we regulate here.

You can also read more about our joint inspections of services for children and young people and our joint inspections of services for adults within the professionals area of our website.


Childminding

Childminders are professional childcare workers who work from their own homes to provide a childcare service for other people’s children in a family setting. 

READ MORE


Daycare of Children

Day care is care provided for infants and toddlers, pre-schoolers and school-aged children in a centre-based facility, such as a nursery, playgroup or afterschool club.

READ MORE


Care homes for adults

There are no legal differences between residential homes and nursing homes. They are all care homes and can be more flexible about the services they offer. They can meet all aspects of your accommodation, support and care including nursing and end-of-life care.

READ MORE


Care at home

Care at home makes sure that as many people as possible are supported in their own homes. The care at home service can touch on all aspects of your daily life in your own home.

READ MORE


Support services

These fall under the heading of day care and can be offered within a care home, centre or to those provided directly in the community and not based in a centre. Support services can help with people who need support with very complicated need to people who need time-limited support at various times.

READ MORE


Housing support

Housing support covers a range of activities that allow you to maintain your accommodation, meet your duties and responsibilities as a tenant and get involved in the local community.

READ MORE


More Information and the above article can be found at https://www.careinspectorate.com/index.php/type-of-care

As part of Fife Council’s Transportation Services, Demand Responsive Transport provides wheelchair-accessible transport free-of-charge to individuals in the community who have difficulty accessing mainstream public transport.

These services are commonly known as Dial-a-Ride and Ring & Ride.

Dial-a-Ride

Dial-a-Ride is a free shopping service for people who have difficulty using conventional public transport. This is a minibus service that will pick you up from your home address and take you to a major shopping centre within your local area.  Please contact us for a timetable for your area which shows the day(s) and time(s) you can travel.

All our buses are easily accessed by very low steps or a lift. The driver is always on hand to help you and will assist you on and off the bus if required.

We can also tell you which shopping centres have ‘Shopmobility‘ (takes you to an external site) who may be able to arrange a helper for you.  A friend can travel with you as a companion and they too will travel free.  You can bring your hearing or guide dog.

Passengers wishing to travel must book their journeys before their day of travel by telephoning

03451 55 11 88 between 9.00 am and 2.30 pm Monday to Friday.

Bookings will normally be accepted up to 14 days in advance.

Ring & Ride

This is a door-to-door service that you must call and book in advance. The bus will call at your door and will take you anywhere within the local area.

All our buses have very low steps or a lift. The driver is always on hand to help you and will assist you on and off the bus if you want.

Ring & Ride currently operates within the following areas:

  • Kirkcaldy
  • Levenmouth – (Leven/Buckhaven/Methil/Methilhill, Kennoway, Windygates)
  • Dunfermline (including Rosyth)
  • Glenrothes

You can travel anywhere within your area. Unfortunately, you cannot use Ring & Ride to travel between different areas of Fife. For example, you cannot travel from Kirkcaldy to Dunfermline, using the Ring & Ride, however we can provide you with transport to an interchange point to allow you onwards travel. This may help when trying to access, for example, hospital appointments out with your area.

Who can use Ring & Ride?
If it is difficult for you to use normal buses then call us. Your difficulty may be permanent or temporary, physical, mental or sensory.

Where can I go?
You can go anywhere you want, as long as it is within your area.You may want to go shopping, visit relatives and friends, go to work or to college, go to the cinema or bingo or just visit the park. Please see the attached leaflet for your area in the publications section at the bottom of the page.

When can I travel?

Operating Area Travel Time from Travel Time to
Kirkcaldy 8.40am 10.00pm
Levenmouth 8.40am 10.00pm
Dunfermline 8.00am 10.00pm
Glenrothes 8.00am 10.00pm

What if I need a helping hand?
If you feel the support of a friend or family member would help please bring them with you. You can also bring your hearing or guide dog.

What does it cost?
Once registered you can travel free.

How do I use Ring & Ride?
We need you to register before you can book a journey. Registration is quick and simple, all you need to do is telephone the Ring & Ride office on 03451 55 11 88.  Registrations will be accepted between 11.00 am and 2pm.

Telephone the booking office on 03451 55 11 88 and tell us where and at what time you want to travel. Our booking office is open Monday to Friday from 9.30am to 2.30pm.

The list below shows the day you need to call us to book your trip:

To travel on: Book your trip on:
Sunday Friday
Monday Friday
Tuesday Monday
Wednesday Tuesday
Thursday Wednesday
Friday Thursday
Saturday Thursday

Please use the contact details below for any further information on these services.  A trained member of staff will take time to discuss with you the various services available within your area.

Ring & Ride 
Tel: 03451 55 11 88
By Post: Rothesay House Rothesay Place Glenrothes Fife KY7 5PQ

The Non-Executive Bills Unit’s Explanatory Notes (see General Note: Explanatory Notes) say: ” 
The Act will lead to all disabled street parking places becoming enforceable. The general approach of the Act is to impose a duty on local authorities, in particular circumstances, to exercise its power to make a particular kind of order under either section 45 (street parking places) or section 35 (off-street parking places) of the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984 (the 1984 Act). The Act does not amend the 1984 Act itself in any way. These kinds of orders which the local authorities are to be required to make are already open to them under the 1984 Act. The powers under the 1984 Act are not affected; rather, this Act separately imposes a duty to exercise those powers in particular circumstances. Once the duty under this Act is triggered, the provision as to procedure and enforcement etc. is that applicable under the 1984 Act.” Continue reading